logo

31 July 2017

Suspected tornado leaves path of destruction in WA city

Fallen trees scatter Katrine Way in Hamersley. Picture: Facebook

A SUSPECTED tornado tore through Perth on Monday, leaving a path of destruction.

It ripped through Perth’s north, with wind gusts of more than 110km/h, damaging buildings and trees and knocking out power to thousands of homes.

The Bureau of Meteorology said it lasted about 10 minutes and moved through the suburbs of Sorrento, Duncraig, Warwick, Hamersley and Balga about 11.10am (AWST), 1.10pm (EST).

At 4.30pm (AWST), more than 3600 homes in the metropolitan area were without power.

The heaviest downpours were in Karnet and Bickley, where rainfall of around 25mm was recorded between 9am and 4.40pm.

Tornadoes can occur two to three times each winter in the metropolitan area, according to the BoM.

More thunderstorms were expected overnight but will clear on Tuesday before another front hits the city on Thursday afternoon.

Weather WA tweeted July was only the second month this year to reach or exceed the monthly average rainfall.

PerthNow reports there were more than 60 calls to crews to fix homes damaged by the suspected tornado, pouring rain and wild winds.

A spokesperson at the Department of Fire and Emergency Services said Balga copped the worst hit out of any other suburb. Eight properties in the suburb suffered from damage.

PerthNow reports homes in Halls Head were also struck, with one home smashed with a neighbour’s porch.

Photos posted on social media show trees fallen over roads and on cars.

The wild weather comes after 100km/h winds took the roof off a Perth apartment block last Friday night.

Duncraig siblings Warren and Andrea Jansen, told PerthNow they were in their bedrooms when the storm hit.

“I opened the curtains as the rain was getting heavier and just saw it getting heavier and louder winds,” Andrea said.

“I saw a trampoline across the road get lifted and there were lots of cracks, bangs, pops, like being in a giant wind tunnel.”

Warren said he could hear the bricks of the house moving.

“I looked out my window and I was like ‘what is this?’ He said.

Andrea said it only lasted about two or three minutes, but was “intense”.

“When it died down I came out the front, lucky we had a good neighbourhood who said ‘don’t come out’ because a power line came down.”

— with AAP

Please follow and like us:

Share
#

Write a comment

4+2 = ?